Category Adverbs

Little differences in German — anders, verschiedene, unterschiedliche

“Ich hätte gern noch ein anderes Bier, bitte.”  This is a phrase that I hear far too often from non-native German speakers. The confusion lies in the translation of the English expression “I’d like another beer, please.” The word another. To help everyone getting confused with the words ander-, verschieden-, and unterschiedlich-. But before we […]

Explaining your actions in German — using um … zu and damit clauses

A post that gets a great deal of attention is the one about how zu is not always used as an preposition, but often with verbs whereby it is followed by the infinitive of the verb. If you haven’t read that post yet, I highly suggest you do after reading this one. We’ve moved. You’ll […]

spürbar oder merkbar and the German suffix -bar

Last week we started looking at a list of words I was asked about by one of my Stammtisch regulars, Edvin. Last week we looked at the words dauernd and dauerhaft, which brought up the interesting topic of the German suffix -haft for adjectives. Edvin also has another similar question on the long list of […]

dauernd vs. dauerhaft and the German suffix -haft

At our Stammtisch last week, one of our attendees, Edvin from Slovenia, asked me if I could quickly clarify the difference between some words. Thinking it would only be a few words, I said sure. He then reached into his pocket and pulled out a page long list of words he wanted to know how […]

When to use the German Future Tense

With the holidays (die Weihnachtszeit) just around the bend many of us are busy making plans of what we’re going to do before the family arrives and what we’ll do once they get here. Talking about the future in English is very clear: either use “going to + infinitive” or “will + infinitive”. We’ve moved. […]

Actually, there is a difference — eigentlich vs. tatsächlich

During one of my lessons the other day a student used the word eigentlich, which I was very happy to hear, as many beginners don’t use this word; however, I also had to correct him and tell him that the word he was looking for was tatsächlich. Now some might think that this is just […]

vor vs. bevor vs. vorher — yes, there’s a difference!

Last week we looked at the words nach, nachdem and nachher. We learned that these words, while they can be used to convey the same information, have different grammatical functions and word order and event order must be observed. This week we’ll look at their counterparts: vor, bevor and vorher. We’ve moved. You’ll find the […]

nach vs. nachdem vs. nachher — what’s the difference?

Anyone learning German should also find that both their logic and English are improving as well. The logic because German sentences are constructed more like mathematical equations and one’s English because you’ll become aware of the different uses of English words and possible substitutes. A brilliant example of this is the German words nach, nachdem, […]

It’s time to sound more like a German — schon/noch

Picture that you’re watching a thriller movie and at a key moment, let’s say one of the female protagonists is alone and a tense string music score starts. You probably know what’s going to happen next. We’ve been conditioned what to expect. When that expectation is not delivered, we find it odd. The same principle […]

German Adverbial Conjunctions — Mix it up, but watch your logic

If you’re reading this and you live in Switzerland, Austria and or any place with winter and hills or mountains you may have tried skiing or ski on a regular basis. Learning a language is a lot like skiing. First you need to trust yourself to go down the piste. In language learning, that’s speaking. […]