Tag Archives: cases

German Adjective Endings – The things we don’t hear

Adjective endings are the bane of most German learners. This is true because as a learner you are expected to get them right, but when you go out into the street you never really hear them from native speakers. This is especially true in Switzerland, but generally from all speakers. Like in English the spoken […]

It’s all relative: Relativsätze

When you first started learning German your teacher probably tried to hammer genders into you. That is that you need to learn all your new nouns with their gender (der, die, das). If you’ve been good, you’ve been doing exactly that. But now you’re starting to read newspapers and other things, you may have noticed […]

mich or mir? accusative vs. dative

I’m often asked: “when do I use mich and when do I use mir?” What at first seems to be a very straight forward question is unfortunately not that easy for many to get their heads around. The answer is that you need to understand the cases. German has four cases: Nominative, Accustaive, dative and […]

Der Die Das

The DER — DIE — DAS

If there is one thing that I stress when teaching German it is the importance of learning nouns with their articles. Like French, Spanish and many other languages German has genders. What makes German just that little harder though is that there are three genders. And the article for words in the plural is the […]

Pronoun Word Cloud

Personal Pronoun Clarification — The many meanings of “sie”

I’ve gone on and on on about how German is a very precise language where one word generally has one meaning. At the same time you’ve probably been thinking that I’m full of it. German has words that are incredibly long, complicated and pretty much unpronounceable and has other words like “sie” that are used […]

Form Word Cloud

The many forms of German words

There are many things that make English a difficult language to learn: English speakers tend to use an extraordinary amount of idioms, there are more tenses and subelties in their usage than with other languages, there are many homonyms and the spelling of a word does not always represent a phonic relation to the word’s […]