Tag Archives: complex German sentences

Correlations in German — Combining ideas in sentences

Quite a few of my students are presently preparing for their B1 and B2 German Exams (Goethe Zertifikat). As we progress through different learning materials, I place a huge focus on writing. Writing is a great way to apply grammatical rules, because you have time to think about it. Writing in this respect is an […]

Explaining your actions in German — using um … zu and damit clauses

A post that gets a great deal of attention is the one about how zu is not always used as an preposition, but often with verbs whereby it is followed by the infinitive of the verb. If you haven’t read that post yet, I highly suggest you do after reading this one. We’ve moved. You’ll […]

5 Ways to negate in German besides using “nicht”

When I communicate with my students over e-mail, assigning extra homework or answering questions that they have between lessons, I generally try to do it in German. The more exposure language learners have to their target language the faster they’ll learn — just like fitness training. However, every once in a while this can lead […]

“Zu” is more than a just a preposition — Using zu-constructions

In one of my lessons this week a student asked me about the word “zu”. She knew that zu is a dative preposition and that it means to in English. I was very happy to hear that those facts about zu had stayed with my student. But then I had to give her a little […]

German Adverbial Conjunctions — Mix it up, but watch your logic

If you’re reading this and you live in Switzerland, Austria and or any place with winter and hills or mountains you may have tried skiing or ski on a regular basis. Learning a language is a lot like skiing. First you need to trust yourself to go down the piste. In language learning, that’s speaking. […]

German Subordinating Conjunctions — Yes, Sometimes the Verb Goes at the End

German has a reputation. Having spent a great deal of time in Canada, I know that German is perceived as a terrible sounding language. Irish comedian Dylan Moran says in one of his routines that, “German sounds like typewriters eating tinfoil being kicked down stairs.” where does this idea come from? Probably from all the […]